jkm's blog

Sharing Thoughts

Songhai 29, 505 otd
Summary:

Hiring these coloured groups were the initial reaction to the claim that corporate Canada is “so white”. These coloured groups met the definition for diversity. They could be used to show that an equal opportunity employer was reaching communities outside of the white communities, which was the initial reaction to racism in corporate Canada. . In corporate Canada there are procedures designed to preserve white supremacy and to transfer its benefits to its shareholders. The coloured groups: East Indian and Asian are able to take advantage of those procedures because they too are shareholders in white supremacy.

Summary:

I wrote this open letter to Stockwell Day because of his comments denying that there is racism in Canada. He is a Canadian who has spent his life working in corporate Canada and in Canadian politics. He most likely has not worked in an office with a Black person. Without a doubt Stockwell Day is a privilege member of Canadian society. As a result of his privilege he had no clue of the racism that people who are not white like him face in corporate Canada. I am an African who has spent a portion of my life trying to get into or working in corporate Canada.

Summary:

Amazing grace how sweet … at this point in hearing that song I always have the same thought: singing this song is sending praises to a devil. I believe that’s true. I believe that the man who wrote that song was the very definition of the devil. When Elijah Muhammad and Malcolm X told us that the white man is the devil, it must have been that white man who led them to that conclusion.

Summary:

There was a time when one drop of black blood made you one of us. The reason it made you one of us had nothing to do with black blood. That rule was not developed because black blood is so powerful that it turned everyone it touches into one of us. We did not put that rule in place.

Summary:

Black History Month is over and perhaps this is an appropriate time to take a moment to reflect. This year we have attended a number of celebrations, found out about some “Black firsts” or in some cases “Black lasts”. Now that it is all said and done, the only remaining question is: what is Black History Month supposed to be about?

Summary:

We can recover our lives. We can take care of ourselves, and we can be the people our ancestors wanted us to be. We believe the same as Marcus Garvey did; it is possible for Africans at home and in the diaspora to be whole, again.

Summary:

Over the past sixty afriyears, ever since integration became the direction we have chosen, role models have been supplanting mentors. The growth of role models and the withering away of mentors throughout the diaspora are a result of the kind of thinking that integration encourages. Integration forces us to think that our effort should not be focused on developing ourselves, our communities, cities or countries, but our effort must somehow be focused on the broader society or world, which is dominated by our enemies.

Summary:

One of the things that it is going to take for us to overcome our little trouble, if we can borrow a line from Bob Marley, is for us to become conscious. Carter G. Woodson, the father of Black History Month and a Beacon of the Way referred to it as “radical”. Regardless of what you called it, being conscious of who we are and who you are, being aware of what time it is on our historical clock is one of the things that is required if we are to be a whole people again.